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    You Don’t Know What Six Sigma Is? It’s All The Rage Right Now

    To start, by definition, Six Sigma is a quality control program. Its goal is to make statistical improvements to business processes.  Think along the lines of project management, financial analysis, improving business production and customer retention. Not to mention better customer service.

    “In 1986, Motorola was so confident that they could make these changes to their production and customer satisfaction that they designed an initiative to reduce their product defects down to 3.4 defects per million products. This initiative was so successful that Motorola expanded it to their other business processes and branded it as Six Sigma.”

    The main value of Six Sigma advocates the idea that all business processes can be optimized through measurement.

    imageSix Sigma is actually a five-step process that goes by DMAIC. The ‘D’ stands for define,  ‘M’ stands for measure, (measure initial performance) ’A’ stands for analyze, (analyze the root of the problem) ‘I’ stands for improve,(improve the system performance) and finally, ‘C’ stands for controls.(create controls into the process to make sure the problem/defect never happens again.)

    One of the most surprising benefits of Six Sigma has been increased employee satisfaction. This is a benefit on top of the increased profits and customer satisfaction. When you apply Six Sigma to your employee’s questions about the company, you not only save time, you remove errors and therefore boost morale.

    Companies have to want to make Six Sigma work for them by sticking to the new rules and controls to make sure they don’t backslide into problems again. The company really will only be as good as the controls and processes that they have in place.

    Difference Between Lean Manufacturing and Agile Manufacturing

    The key similarity is that both lean and agile manufacturing are intended to lower costs while making improvements through all processes. However, there are still some differences in both of the methodologies.

    Being able to minimize and reduce the costs that are involved with manufacturing is the main goal of lean manufacturing. It focusses on what is necessary. Just how an individual that is considered lean most likely obtains that body figure by not eating more than what is necessary for their body. Lean manufacturing has a demand-based and aims to eliminate the storage of inventory. It improves the effective uses of utilities, facilities, and materials. This type of manufacturing puts emphasis on improvement and the measure of performance.

    Agile manufacturing is best compared when thinking of an individual that is fit. An individual can be both lean and fit at the same time. Taking that same analogy, an organization can both be lean and agile. However, agile does not immediately mean that an organization is also lean. It has been mentioned that agile manufacturing is considered to stem from the processes of lean manufacturing. This is because these practices of lean manufacturing allow the practices and approaches of agile manufacturing to be successfully completed. The similarities to both types of manufacturing are listed below:

    • The support of sustainability and revenue creation
    • The improvement of competitiveness

    When both types of manufacturing are combined, it’s often referred to as leagile manufacturing. By using the listed types of approaches, leagile manufacturing can be successfully applied.

    • Make-to-stock manufacturing is an approach of lean that can be used for manufacturing products that are in high demand. Make-to-order will allow the high demand products to be made as they are order as an approach of agile manufacturing.
    • By using the creation of a flexible production capacity, this allows an organization to respond to the unexpected surges of demand of customer requirements and orders.
    • The implementation of postponement strategies allows a product to be manufactured in advance. This then allows any variation and other changes to be added to the product in the process of the final assembly for the finished product.

    When you are able to understand how both manufacturing processes and approaches are used in order to benefit the organization, higher levels of success will be achieved when you use them to the specific needs your consumers require. Lean and agile manufacturing both have many benefits to reap when you commit to using one, the other, or both.

    Hope For American Manufacturing

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    “Manufacturing is one of the foundations of what American society and our communities are. If we can keep jobs and revenues here in our communities, then it’s good for all of us. We will all have higher-paying jobs, and we will all have happier communities.” Said Scott Marland, director of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center at The University of Utah.

    The United States lost 30 percent of its manufacturing jobs between 1998 and 2016, according to Federal Reserve data. Over the next ten years, nearly 3½ million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled, and 2 million are expected to go unfilled due to the lack of skills by today’s workers. According to a recent report, 80 percent of manufacturers report a moderate or serious shortage of qualified applicants for skilled and highly-skilled production positions. (Source: Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute)  – See more here

    The University of Utah, along with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, announced the opening of the new Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center on campus. The center is there to give services to manufacturing companies in the areas of technology, worker education, and searching for investors. This center is part of a national group of centers across the US and is managed by the US Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    These centers are helping manufacturing companies on a global scale with services in growth, operational excellence, and new technologies like digital, nano, and additive manufacturing. Hope For American Manufacturing and Its Employees

    In 2015, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned $81,289 annually, including pay and benefits. The average worker in all nonfarm industries earned $63,830. Looking specifically at wages, the average manufacturing worker earned nearly $26.00 per hour, according to the latest figures, not including benefits. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis and Bureau of Labor Statistics) – See more here 

    For every $1.00 spent in manufacturing, another $1.81 is added to the economy. That is the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector. Also, for every one worker in manufacturing, there are another four employees hired elsewhere. (Source: NAM calculations using IMPLAN) – See more here 

    We need to make America great again and bring back our manufacturing. Bring back our middle class. Bring back our dignity as a nation, and bring back Made In The USA. Keeping jobs and money here, in our communities is good for all of us. We need to train our future workers in these industries and with these new skills needed so that they can succeed in helping to build our nation and our manufacturing industry back up to the top.

    How Do The Holidays Affect US Supply Chains?

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    In the wake of giant shipping company Hanjin’s bankruptcy is a mess that retailers across the country will be sorting out for weeks, if not months.

    The South Korean company’s bankruptcy is forcing big chains to spend buckets of cash to get their goods from ports to warehouses in time for the busy holiday shopping season. Also, some small businesses could have less to offer this year because of this.

    “Samsung had the most cargo on Hanjin ships by a long shot, with more than 8,000 container units of goods stacked on the vessels from August through the end of September, according to Datamyne, which tracks trade data. Other big names included Hanes, J.C. Penney, Microsoft, and Kmart”. Ashley Furniture also had about 900 containers on ships, plus had to find trucking companies to deliver all of it at additional costs.

    Parents and retailers alike are hoping that the aging US infrastructure along with shipping problems, won’t leave them trying to explain to children why the “Must Have” toy this season just isn’t going to be under the tree.

    As we all know, the holiday season is a make-or-break time for retailers along with suppliers. Getting all products to the right place at the right time is at it’s most critical during this time of year. Retail supply chains and distributors need to have plans in place to deliver all of the goods that are expected to be sitting on store shelves and warehouses. Consumers are ready and willing to part with their hard-earned cash in order to buy the gifts that everyone on their Christmas lists wants.

    “During last year’s peak season, for example, consumer electronics giant Hewlett-Packard shipped 10.5 million products to U.S. retailers in the first 25 days of November alone”. According to HP spokesperson Laura Wandke.

    “The holiday season puts great pressure on all U.S. supply chains because everyone peaks at the same time,” explains Larry Ravinett, senior vice president of logistics and supply chain solutions for National Retail Systems (NRS), a Secaucus, N.J.-based 3PL specializing in retail logistics.

    Forty percent to 50 percent of revenue for the year is earned in this very short time period,“ he adds.

    The last few years have seen record port congestion and a 10 day West Coast port shutdown that had over 300,000 containers waiting for deliveries across the country. Since then, the industry has tried to be better prepared to handle any challenges that arise, including seasonal issues.

    According to Brooks Bentz, a partner with consulting firm Accenture,Peak season shippers should position themselves to succeed in the following areas:

    Transportation network management. Develop a comprehensive, real-time view of the supply chain and of available transportation alternatives, including service options, cost/service trade-offs, and preferred providers.

    Strategic transportation services sourcing. Use a holistic, multimodal approach to procuring transportation services, and leverage overlapping capacity and demand networks to optimize costs and service.

    Demand planning and forecasting. Feed updated demand data to all trading partners, with enough granularity—such as specific information by day, week, or month—to enable proactive planning to meet capacity and service requirements.

    Supply chain visibility and event management. Provide real-time visibility at the SKU level so inventory can be tracked, diverted, or reallocated as needed. By doing this, shippers can detect potential disruptions and identify and address bottlenecks.

    Here is to hoping that all goes well this holiday season and for every child that has asked for that special toy to find it under their tree this Christmas morning.

    The Kline-Fogleman Airfoil

    The Kline-Fogleman airfoil, also known as the KF airfoil, wing was designed by Richard Kline and Floyd Fogleman, hence the name. The Kline-Fogleman airfoil is an airfoil that is designed with a single or with multiple steps induced along the length of the wing. The steps that are induced are primarily located on the top or underside of the wing with the intent to assist with greater lift and stability during the flight process.

    The Kline-Fogleman AirfoilBy Jason Davis
The Kline-Fogleman airfoil, also known as the KF airfoil, wing was designed by Richard Kline and Floyd Fogleman, hence the name. The Kline-Fogleman airfoil is an airfoil that is designed with a single or with...The Kline-Fogleman airfoils and the Kline-Fogleman modified airfoils refer to the introduction of a step either on the bottom, top or both of an airfoil. It can also be used in conjunction with two steps on the top or bottom of the airfoil. The steps all work extremely well  on smaller airfoils such as radio controlled aircraft.

    The purpose of the step on the Kline-Fogleman airfoil is to allow some of the displaced air to fall into a pocket behind the step and become part of the airfoil shape as a trapped vortex. This prevents separation of the boundary layer and maintains a smooth and constant airflow over the surface of the airfoil.Richard Kline wanted to make a paper airplane that would be able to handle the strong winds outdoors and be able to climb high then level off by itself and go into a nice long glide After many trials and error experiments, he was able to achieve this goal. One day he showed the paper airplane to Floyd Fogleman who watched it fly and resisted stalling. The two men later decided to file for a patent on a stepped airfoil.

    Richard Kline and Floyd Fogleman went to see Dr. John Nicolaides who was teaching at Notre Dame and was the first head of NASA. Dr. John Nicolaides was extremely intrigued with the idea. And so were the people at Time Magazine. On April 2, 1973, an article was written and published about the Kline-Fogleman airfoil.The early wind tunnel testing showed that the step on top had higher lift over drag ratios than when it was placed on the bottom. It was decided to show the step on the bottom in the patent because when an aircraft goes from subsonic to supersonic the lift over drag characteristics reverse themselves. Thus, supersonically the higher lift over drag characteristic would be available.

    The idea behind the airfoil is a new and improved airfoil for aircraft adapting to a greater variety of airspeeds. Characteristics of the Kline-Fogleman airfoil include having a continuous upper surface and a lower surface having a stepped discontinuity. The surfaces being angle related and space related to define a chord section that increases in thickness from the leading edge of the airfoil to the discontinuity. Conventional airfoils are generally designed to either generate a lot of lift in order to carry more weight, which means they must be thicker to produce more lift, or they need to be thinner in order to fly faster thus sacrificing lifting heavier loads. The characteristics of Kline-Fogleman airfoil can do both of these tasks extremely well.

    Read more about how innovative designs have changed the way we think about aviation in Aerospace Manufacturing: How the Aviation Industry Shaped American Manufacturing by Carter Mathews.

    Giving Thanks This Thanksgiving

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                                                 by Colleen Harmes

    Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a federal holiday every year since 1863, when, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”, to be celebrated on the last Thursday in November.

    Nowadays our celebration would probably be unrecognizable to the people of 1863. We have giant turkeys, candied yams with marshmallows on top, string bean casserole, mashed potatoes and gravy, and of course the all time favorite, pumpkin pie.

    We sit at home with family and friends and watch football games,we  play  football with the children out in the yard where the grown-ups play against the kids. The chefs and bakers of the family are busy in the kitchen and catching up with the happenings of their family and friends. We are all having such a great time together.

    When dinner time comes around, we all sit around the beautifully decorated table with lovingly prepared food sat on it. We all hold hands and thank God for this meal and the time we have together. But, we also need to remember and give thanks to all of our loved ones who can’t be there with us. The people who are thousands of miles away, in foreign countries, working to protect our freedoms so that we can watch football, and enjoy the amazing food of the day known as Thanksgiving.

    All of us at Brithe Publishing wishes you and yours a Happy Thanksgiving

    Total Productive Maintenance

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    Traditionally, maintenance has always been viewed more as a supporting function versus a non-value adding function of a business or organization. Until recent years, managing equipment performance has not been the biggest priority in a manufacturing industry. The adverse affects of the organizational competitiveness among aeronautical manufacturers today are often blamed on that of the inadequacies of the maintenance practices in the past. So to counter this, companies are paying more attention than ever to the maintenance practices that they conduct. This is easier said than done considering the fact that the global sector of aeronautical manufacturing has undergone massive changes within the past quarter century. Aeronautical manufacturers have accepted the fact that equipment maintenance, in addition to general aircraft maintenance, is an indispensable function for ensuring the sustained profitability of the entire enterprise. With that said, the search for reliable manufacturing equipment, in addition to the maintenance to go along with it, is of the utmost importance.

    Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is based on the foundation of JIPM, Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance. JIPM has evolved from a solution to the globalization challenges and energy crisis of the early 2000’s to achieve more with less.

    The achievements of manufacturing an enterprise through the strategies and implementations of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) initiatives are clear if studying a company that follows these practices and one that does not.  The goal of TPM is to have no equipment breakdowns, through part replacement programs, before failure. This is attainable if implemented correctly and effectively.

    Happy Election Day!

    No matter who you are voting for, America will be great in the end, as it always has been.

    America was great on November 7th, is great on November 8th and will be great on November 9th.

    #Progress

    Leaders of both parties embraced the theme and the strategy, producing several pieces of legislation designed to protect American manufacturers. Both are promising to protect manufacturers from currency manipulation and encouraging new technologies to be utilized.

    Do your part in #KeepingAmericaGreat… #GoVote

    To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before

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    Watching Star Trek as a kid (reruns of course!) was just amazing. All those cool gadgets they had made me want to be on the Star Ship Enterprise. Wouldn’t it be awesome if we had those gadgets? Well, with Additive Manufacturing, we can start to see the future now.
    Additive Manufacturing is all the rage in the news lately. Even though this industry has been around for over 30 years, it is now becoming mainstream.  Additive Manufacturing is expected to grow to a $300 Billion business by 2030.
    “We have seen 3D printing begin to have a secure impact in design and manufacturing of a product. The biggest impact the 3D printing has is on prototyping of products and what we are seeing is in actual products that are used in real life,” says Greg Eden of Autodesk.

    Additive Manufacturing is having a huge impact on how manufacturers look at product design. This industry has grown over 26% in the last year alone. Medicine, dentistry, construction, automotive, and aerospace are all using this technology right now and its use will only become more widespread.

    The International Space Station even has a 3D Printer onboard to make parts that are needed for fast fixes to problems that pop up. Parts can be created that are stronger and more lightweight than ever before. For example, an aluminum part can be made with the strength of steel using this process.

    Design is limited by only the imagination with this technology, unlike conventional technology where you are stuck with particular challenges of the equipment being used.
    I cannot wait to see what the future holds for this growing industry. Yesterday’s science fiction is now today’s reality.

    Additive Manufacturing

    Shots, Shots, Shots, Shot, Shot,Shots…Additive Manufacturing

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    by Colleen Harmes

    Additive Manufacturing or AM, is the industrial version of 3D printing, whereby 3D objects are made by adding layer upon layer of material.

    This technology was invented at MIT where they are working on machines that can build machines among other ongoing projects.

    Now, this technology is about to be in a bar near you. Jevo, developed by Food and Beverage Innovations, is the first automated gelatin shot maker.

    Let’s hear it for innovative manufacturing! The idea for this jello-shot maker is so simple, I wish I would have thought of it.

    This technology of making alcohol filled jello shots come out of a machine took them 3 years to develop out in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

    All the cool stuff is in Oregon, right?

    How it works is simple. A bartender pops in a canister of jello powder, adds in your choice of alcohol, and voila, Jevo has just made 20 jello shots for you and your friends to enjoy. You can choose from nine different flavors of jello and any alcohol you prefer. This process used to take hours before Jevo. Now you can have your party starting in 10 minutes thanks to additive manufacturing.

    One caveat of trying to build possibly the coolest party machine ever was the fact that all of the materials available to Food and Beverage Innovations was not  compatible with food and beverage companies. Trying to get a product to market quickly and finding that almost all of the materials used in 3D Printing are not food safe made things difficult. Then they found Plural AM.

    Plural AM is just five minutes from Food and Beverage Innovations offices and they supplied them with the food-safe 3D printing thermoplastics they needed. These two companies started to work together to fabricate the different components needed. They had to remake a part with tight clearances  four times to get it to work perfectly. Now that everything is working as it should, they have moved into production and have eight beta testers using Jevo and sending feedback to Food and Beverage Innovations. “By the end of the year, Levitsky said that the firm intends to manufacture a few hundred machines before unleashing over 5,000 on the world in 2017.”

    Wouldn’t it be cool to know that your first jello shot from a machine was made with 3D printing/Additive Manufacturing?

    For more info and to purchase books on manufacturing, engineering, thought leadership, and supply chain head to our website at http://www.brithe-publishing.com/ .

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    You Don’t Know What Six Sigma Is? It’s All The Rage Right Now

    To start, by definition, Six Sigma is a quality control program. Its goal is to make statistical improvements to business processes.  Think along the lines of project management, financial analysis, improving business production and customer retention. Not to mention better customer service.

    “In 1986, Motorola was so confident that they could make these changes to their production and customer satisfaction that they designed an initiative to reduce their product defects down to 3.4 defects per million products. This initiative was so successful that Motorola expanded it to their other business processes and branded it as Six Sigma.”

    The main value of Six Sigma advocates the idea that all business processes can be optimized through measurement.

    imageSix Sigma is actually a five-step process that goes by DMAIC. The ‘D’ stands for define,  ‘M’ stands for measure, (measure initial performance) ’A’ stands for analyze, (analyze the root of the problem) ‘I’ stands for improve,(improve the system performance) and finally, ‘C’ stands for controls.(create controls into the process to make sure the problem/defect never happens again.)

    One of the most surprising benefits of Six Sigma has been increased employee satisfaction. This is a benefit on top of the increased profits and customer satisfaction. When you apply Six Sigma to your employee’s questions about the company, you not only save time, you remove errors and therefore boost morale.

    Companies have to want to make Six Sigma work for them by sticking to the new rules and controls to make sure they don’t backslide into problems again. The company really will only be as good as the controls and processes that they have in place.

    Difference Between Lean Manufacturing and Agile Manufacturing

    The key similarity is that both lean and agile manufacturing are intended to lower costs while making improvements through all processes. However, there are still some differences in both of the methodologies.

    Being able to minimize and reduce the costs that are involved with manufacturing is the main goal of lean manufacturing. It focusses on what is necessary. Just how an individual that is considered lean most likely obtains that body figure by not eating more than what is necessary for their body. Lean manufacturing has a demand-based and aims to eliminate the storage of inventory. It improves the effective uses of utilities, facilities, and materials. This type of manufacturing puts emphasis on improvement and the measure of performance.

    Agile manufacturing is best compared when thinking of an individual that is fit. An individual can be both lean and fit at the same time. Taking that same analogy, an organization can both be lean and agile. However, agile does not immediately mean that an organization is also lean. It has been mentioned that agile manufacturing is considered to stem from the processes of lean manufacturing. This is because these practices of lean manufacturing allow the practices and approaches of agile manufacturing to be successfully completed. The similarities to both types of manufacturing are listed below:

    • The support of sustainability and revenue creation
    • The improvement of competitiveness

    When both types of manufacturing are combined, it’s often referred to as leagile manufacturing. By using the listed types of approaches, leagile manufacturing can be successfully applied.

    • Make-to-stock manufacturing is an approach of lean that can be used for manufacturing products that are in high demand. Make-to-order will allow the high demand products to be made as they are order as an approach of agile manufacturing.
    • By using the creation of a flexible production capacity, this allows an organization to respond to the unexpected surges of demand of customer requirements and orders.
    • The implementation of postponement strategies allows a product to be manufactured in advance. This then allows any variation and other changes to be added to the product in the process of the final assembly for the finished product.

    When you are able to understand how both manufacturing processes and approaches are used in order to benefit the organization, higher levels of success will be achieved when you use them to the specific needs your consumers require. Lean and agile manufacturing both have many benefits to reap when you commit to using one, the other, or both.

    Hope For American Manufacturing

    image

    “Manufacturing is one of the foundations of what American society and our communities are. If we can keep jobs and revenues here in our communities, then it’s good for all of us. We will all have higher-paying jobs, and we will all have happier communities.” Said Scott Marland, director of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center at The University of Utah.

    The United States lost 30 percent of its manufacturing jobs between 1998 and 2016, according to Federal Reserve data. Over the next ten years, nearly 3½ million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled, and 2 million are expected to go unfilled due to the lack of skills by today’s workers. According to a recent report, 80 percent of manufacturers report a moderate or serious shortage of qualified applicants for skilled and highly-skilled production positions. (Source: Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute)  – See more here

    The University of Utah, along with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, announced the opening of the new Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center on campus. The center is there to give services to manufacturing companies in the areas of technology, worker education, and searching for investors. This center is part of a national group of centers across the US and is managed by the US Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    These centers are helping manufacturing companies on a global scale with services in growth, operational excellence, and new technologies like digital, nano, and additive manufacturing. Hope For American Manufacturing and Its Employees

    In 2015, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned $81,289 annually, including pay and benefits. The average worker in all nonfarm industries earned $63,830. Looking specifically at wages, the average manufacturing worker earned nearly $26.00 per hour, according to the latest figures, not including benefits. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis and Bureau of Labor Statistics) – See more here 

    For every $1.00 spent in manufacturing, another $1.81 is added to the economy. That is the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector. Also, for every one worker in manufacturing, there are another four employees hired elsewhere. (Source: NAM calculations using IMPLAN) – See more here 

    We need to make America great again and bring back our manufacturing. Bring back our middle class. Bring back our dignity as a nation, and bring back Made In The USA. Keeping jobs and money here, in our communities is good for all of us. We need to train our future workers in these industries and with these new skills needed so that they can succeed in helping to build our nation and our manufacturing industry back up to the top.

    How Do The Holidays Affect US Supply Chains?

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    In the wake of giant shipping company Hanjin’s bankruptcy is a mess that retailers across the country will be sorting out for weeks, if not months.

    The South Korean company’s bankruptcy is forcing big chains to spend buckets of cash to get their goods from ports to warehouses in time for the busy holiday shopping season. Also, some small businesses could have less to offer this year because of this.

    “Samsung had the most cargo on Hanjin ships by a long shot, with more than 8,000 container units of goods stacked on the vessels from August through the end of September, according to Datamyne, which tracks trade data. Other big names included Hanes, J.C. Penney, Microsoft, and Kmart”. Ashley Furniture also had about 900 containers on ships, plus had to find trucking companies to deliver all of it at additional costs.

    Parents and retailers alike are hoping that the aging US infrastructure along with shipping problems, won’t leave them trying to explain to children why the “Must Have” toy this season just isn’t going to be under the tree.

    As we all know, the holiday season is a make-or-break time for retailers along with suppliers. Getting all products to the right place at the right time is at it’s most critical during this time of year. Retail supply chains and distributors need to have plans in place to deliver all of the goods that are expected to be sitting on store shelves and warehouses. Consumers are ready and willing to part with their hard-earned cash in order to buy the gifts that everyone on their Christmas lists wants.

    “During last year’s peak season, for example, consumer electronics giant Hewlett-Packard shipped 10.5 million products to U.S. retailers in the first 25 days of November alone”. According to HP spokesperson Laura Wandke.

    “The holiday season puts great pressure on all U.S. supply chains because everyone peaks at the same time,” explains Larry Ravinett, senior vice president of logistics and supply chain solutions for National Retail Systems (NRS), a Secaucus, N.J.-based 3PL specializing in retail logistics.

    Forty percent to 50 percent of revenue for the year is earned in this very short time period,“ he adds.

    The last few years have seen record port congestion and a 10 day West Coast port shutdown that had over 300,000 containers waiting for deliveries across the country. Since then, the industry has tried to be better prepared to handle any challenges that arise, including seasonal issues.

    According to Brooks Bentz, a partner with consulting firm Accenture,Peak season shippers should position themselves to succeed in the following areas:

    Transportation network management. Develop a comprehensive, real-time view of the supply chain and of available transportation alternatives, including service options, cost/service trade-offs, and preferred providers.

    Strategic transportation services sourcing. Use a holistic, multimodal approach to procuring transportation services, and leverage overlapping capacity and demand networks to optimize costs and service.

    Demand planning and forecasting. Feed updated demand data to all trading partners, with enough granularity—such as specific information by day, week, or month—to enable proactive planning to meet capacity and service requirements.

    Supply chain visibility and event management. Provide real-time visibility at the SKU level so inventory can be tracked, diverted, or reallocated as needed. By doing this, shippers can detect potential disruptions and identify and address bottlenecks.

    Here is to hoping that all goes well this holiday season and for every child that has asked for that special toy to find it under their tree this Christmas morning.

    The Kline-Fogleman Airfoil

    The Kline-Fogleman airfoil, also known as the KF airfoil, wing was designed by Richard Kline and Floyd Fogleman, hence the name. The Kline-Fogleman airfoil is an airfoil that is designed with a single or with multiple steps induced along the length of the wing. The steps that are induced are primarily located on the top or underside of the wing with the intent to assist with greater lift and stability during the flight process.

    The Kline-Fogleman AirfoilBy Jason Davis
The Kline-Fogleman airfoil, also known as the KF airfoil, wing was designed by Richard Kline and Floyd Fogleman, hence the name. The Kline-Fogleman airfoil is an airfoil that is designed with a single or with...The Kline-Fogleman airfoils and the Kline-Fogleman modified airfoils refer to the introduction of a step either on the bottom, top or both of an airfoil. It can also be used in conjunction with two steps on the top or bottom of the airfoil. The steps all work extremely well  on smaller airfoils such as radio controlled aircraft.

    The purpose of the step on the Kline-Fogleman airfoil is to allow some of the displaced air to fall into a pocket behind the step and become part of the airfoil shape as a trapped vortex. This prevents separation of the boundary layer and maintains a smooth and constant airflow over the surface of the airfoil.Richard Kline wanted to make a paper airplane that would be able to handle the strong winds outdoors and be able to climb high then level off by itself and go into a nice long glide After many trials and error experiments, he was able to achieve this goal. One day he showed the paper airplane to Floyd Fogleman who watched it fly and resisted stalling. The two men later decided to file for a patent on a stepped airfoil.

    Richard Kline and Floyd Fogleman went to see Dr. John Nicolaides who was teaching at Notre Dame and was the first head of NASA. Dr. John Nicolaides was extremely intrigued with the idea. And so were the people at Time Magazine. On April 2, 1973, an article was written and published about the Kline-Fogleman airfoil.The early wind tunnel testing showed that the step on top had higher lift over drag ratios than when it was placed on the bottom. It was decided to show the step on the bottom in the patent because when an aircraft goes from subsonic to supersonic the lift over drag characteristics reverse themselves. Thus, supersonically the higher lift over drag characteristic would be available.

    The idea behind the airfoil is a new and improved airfoil for aircraft adapting to a greater variety of airspeeds. Characteristics of the Kline-Fogleman airfoil include having a continuous upper surface and a lower surface having a stepped discontinuity. The surfaces being angle related and space related to define a chord section that increases in thickness from the leading edge of the airfoil to the discontinuity. Conventional airfoils are generally designed to either generate a lot of lift in order to carry more weight, which means they must be thicker to produce more lift, or they need to be thinner in order to fly faster thus sacrificing lifting heavier loads. The characteristics of Kline-Fogleman airfoil can do both of these tasks extremely well.

    Read more about how innovative designs have changed the way we think about aviation in Aerospace Manufacturing: How the Aviation Industry Shaped American Manufacturing by Carter Mathews.

    Giving Thanks This Thanksgiving

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                                                 by Colleen Harmes

    Thanksgiving has been celebrated as a federal holiday every year since 1863, when, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”, to be celebrated on the last Thursday in November.

    Nowadays our celebration would probably be unrecognizable to the people of 1863. We have giant turkeys, candied yams with marshmallows on top, string bean casserole, mashed potatoes and gravy, and of course the all time favorite, pumpkin pie.

    We sit at home with family and friends and watch football games,we  play  football with the children out in the yard where the grown-ups play against the kids. The chefs and bakers of the family are busy in the kitchen and catching up with the happenings of their family and friends. We are all having such a great time together.

    When dinner time comes around, we all sit around the beautifully decorated table with lovingly prepared food sat on it. We all hold hands and thank God for this meal and the time we have together. But, we also need to remember and give thanks to all of our loved ones who can’t be there with us. The people who are thousands of miles away, in foreign countries, working to protect our freedoms so that we can watch football, and enjoy the amazing food of the day known as Thanksgiving.

    All of us at Brithe Publishing wishes you and yours a Happy Thanksgiving

    Total Productive Maintenance

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    Traditionally, maintenance has always been viewed more as a supporting function versus a non-value adding function of a business or organization. Until recent years, managing equipment performance has not been the biggest priority in a manufacturing industry. The adverse affects of the organizational competitiveness among aeronautical manufacturers today are often blamed on that of the inadequacies of the maintenance practices in the past. So to counter this, companies are paying more attention than ever to the maintenance practices that they conduct. This is easier said than done considering the fact that the global sector of aeronautical manufacturing has undergone massive changes within the past quarter century. Aeronautical manufacturers have accepted the fact that equipment maintenance, in addition to general aircraft maintenance, is an indispensable function for ensuring the sustained profitability of the entire enterprise. With that said, the search for reliable manufacturing equipment, in addition to the maintenance to go along with it, is of the utmost importance.

    Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is based on the foundation of JIPM, Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance. JIPM has evolved from a solution to the globalization challenges and energy crisis of the early 2000’s to achieve more with less.

    The achievements of manufacturing an enterprise through the strategies and implementations of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) initiatives are clear if studying a company that follows these practices and one that does not.  The goal of TPM is to have no equipment breakdowns, through part replacement programs, before failure. This is attainable if implemented correctly and effectively.

    Happy Election Day!

    No matter who you are voting for, America will be great in the end, as it always has been.

    America was great on November 7th, is great on November 8th and will be great on November 9th.

    #Progress

    Leaders of both parties embraced the theme and the strategy, producing several pieces of legislation designed to protect American manufacturers. Both are promising to protect manufacturers from currency manipulation and encouraging new technologies to be utilized.

    Do your part in #KeepingAmericaGreat… #GoVote

    To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before

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    Watching Star Trek as a kid (reruns of course!) was just amazing. All those cool gadgets they had made me want to be on the Star Ship Enterprise. Wouldn’t it be awesome if we had those gadgets? Well, with Additive Manufacturing, we can start to see the future now.
    Additive Manufacturing is all the rage in the news lately. Even though this industry has been around for over 30 years, it is now becoming mainstream.  Additive Manufacturing is expected to grow to a $300 Billion business by 2030.
    “We have seen 3D printing begin to have a secure impact in design and manufacturing of a product. The biggest impact the 3D printing has is on prototyping of products and what we are seeing is in actual products that are used in real life,” says Greg Eden of Autodesk.

    Additive Manufacturing is having a huge impact on how manufacturers look at product design. This industry has grown over 26% in the last year alone. Medicine, dentistry, construction, automotive, and aerospace are all using this technology right now and its use will only become more widespread.

    The International Space Station even has a 3D Printer onboard to make parts that are needed for fast fixes to problems that pop up. Parts can be created that are stronger and more lightweight than ever before. For example, an aluminum part can be made with the strength of steel using this process.

    Design is limited by only the imagination with this technology, unlike conventional technology where you are stuck with particular challenges of the equipment being used.
    I cannot wait to see what the future holds for this growing industry. Yesterday’s science fiction is now today’s reality.

    Additive Manufacturing

    Shots, Shots, Shots, Shot, Shot,Shots…Additive Manufacturing

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    by Colleen Harmes

    Additive Manufacturing or AM, is the industrial version of 3D printing, whereby 3D objects are made by adding layer upon layer of material.

    This technology was invented at MIT where they are working on machines that can build machines among other ongoing projects.

    Now, this technology is about to be in a bar near you. Jevo, developed by Food and Beverage Innovations, is the first automated gelatin shot maker.

    Let’s hear it for innovative manufacturing! The idea for this jello-shot maker is so simple, I wish I would have thought of it.

    This technology of making alcohol filled jello shots come out of a machine took them 3 years to develop out in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

    All the cool stuff is in Oregon, right?

    How it works is simple. A bartender pops in a canister of jello powder, adds in your choice of alcohol, and voila, Jevo has just made 20 jello shots for you and your friends to enjoy. You can choose from nine different flavors of jello and any alcohol you prefer. This process used to take hours before Jevo. Now you can have your party starting in 10 minutes thanks to additive manufacturing.

    One caveat of trying to build possibly the coolest party machine ever was the fact that all of the materials available to Food and Beverage Innovations was not  compatible with food and beverage companies. Trying to get a product to market quickly and finding that almost all of the materials used in 3D Printing are not food safe made things difficult. Then they found Plural AM.

    Plural AM is just five minutes from Food and Beverage Innovations offices and they supplied them with the food-safe 3D printing thermoplastics they needed. These two companies started to work together to fabricate the different components needed. They had to remake a part with tight clearances  four times to get it to work perfectly. Now that everything is working as it should, they have moved into production and have eight beta testers using Jevo and sending feedback to Food and Beverage Innovations. “By the end of the year, Levitsky said that the firm intends to manufacture a few hundred machines before unleashing over 5,000 on the world in 2017.”

    Wouldn’t it be cool to know that your first jello shot from a machine was made with 3D printing/Additive Manufacturing?

    For more info and to purchase books on manufacturing, engineering, thought leadership, and supply chain head to our website at http://www.brithe-publishing.com/ .

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