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    From Learning to Marketing, One Leader’s Worthwhile Switch

    I recently read this article and thought that I should share it with all of you. Have you ever had a manager that has gone from sales to the marketing end of the business and still acts as a salesman with their approach to management? I have and I found it very frustrating. They are now coaches who need to understand how to observe and speak to people. Let me sell, you help me understand the behavior behind the sale.

    Here is the article from clomedia.com:

    The chief learning officer role is a flexible one. Richardson’s Andrea Grodnitzky shared how her move from CLO to CMO opened her eyes to beneficial sales-based learning strategies.

    January 9, 2017

    by Nidhi Madhavan

    Successful marketers need to fully understand their customers. For Andrea Grodnitzky, the new chief marketing officer at Richardson Sales Training, her customers are learning leaders at some of the world’s top sales organizations.

    Grodnitzky spent the prior year as Richardson’s chief learning officer. She’s been with the sales performance improvement company for almost 14 years, working with founder Linda Richardson to develop core programs and eventually lead the design and facilitation teams. As CLO, Grodnitzky took on a customer-facing role, writing thought leadership pieces and representing Richardson to existing and prospective clients. Thus, the transition to CMO came naturally.

    “Our customers are both sales professionals and learning leaders,” she explained. “I’ve been working with these folks for quite some time, so it’s nice to bring that knowledge with me to this new role.”

    She spoke to Chief Learning Officer about sales organizations’ learning needs and the trends shaping them.

    Richardson is a 37-year-old company. How have the learning needs of sales teams changed over time?

    The most dramatic changes have happened in just the past few years. First, both business buyers and consumers have changed their buying behavior due to the availability of information online and advances in mobile technology; we can now ask opinions and research products instantly. This shift means sales people must be upskilled to engage with today’s hyper-informed customers.

    Second, the pace of business has sped up. In some ways, technology has helped salespeople become more efficient, but expectations from management and customers have increased as well. Learning solutions now need to fit into busier lifestyles. Companies need to prioritize skills training and make sure that learning is bite-sized, easily accessible and relevant.

    Finally, higher buying expectations have led many companies to form extended sales teams with individuals who don’t have formal sales backgrounds. Learning leaders need to ensure they provide these teams with the right knowledge and skills.

    Richardson works with many Fortune 500 and Fortune 1000 clients. Are there any training strategies common to these companies that contribute to their success?

    There are certainly a variety of approaches, but there are some common themes we see in our most successful clients:

    1. They decide what success looks like before they begin. They identify the key performance indicators that matter to them and then partner with firms like us to create the right measurement approach. They also look at their progress along the way to inform their continued investment and adjust to learner needs.
    2. They have strong buy-in from leadership, in words and actions. Strong organizations orchestrate senior leader buy-in and ongoing engagement as part of their plans, making sure leaders themselves understand the importance of their investment and role in training initiatives.
    3. They ensure that learning is contextual and relevant. Sales professionals don’t like spending time on activities they don’t perceive as important. Successful organizations connect the dots on how their programs will help them meet targets by utilizing case studies and real-life scenarios.

    Sustaining sales behaviors taught during training is one of Richardson’s key goals. What mistakes do organizations often make reinforcing learning in the field?

    Sales managers are an important investment area; their support is critical for any learning initiative to succeed. But learning leaders often take for granted that managers know how to observe and coach. For example, a manager may understand the importance of a strong opening with a customer, but their coaching will be watered down if they haven’t been taught the observable behaviors to watch for.

    Organizations also need to train managers on how to coach effectively. Most managers are former sales professionals, but the skills that helped them succeed in sales can conflict with those needed to be a great coach. A sales manager might be itching to take over a sales encounter, but they need to learn to step back and develop their team members’ skills.

    We talked about trends that have already affected sales teams, but are there any new learning trends we may see in 2017 and beyond?

    We’ve spent some time listening to our clients during advisory boards and quarterly meetings, and here’s what we’re hearing:

    Mobile learning: It’s no longer just nice to have. It’s been on the horizon, but not all sales organizations are quite there. Sales people live on their phones; if you want to reach them, that’s where to go.

    Expectations: Learner expectations are no longer based on other training programs. Learning organizations need to take a cue from digital spaces like Facebook, YouTube and Google, where people spend most of their time.

    Personalization: Engaging content meets learners exactly where they are on the learning journey. New technology and techniques allow organizations to personalize content without massive effort.

    Analytics: We’re in the “show me” age. Learning leaders will see increased efforts to track and display impactful results. The key is to tell the story around the data.

    How To Avoid These 5 Leadership Lies

    1. Data Lies – Remember the recent election? What was the data showing? It all showed that Hillary would be our next President—Wrong! It could have been hacked (by Russia some say) or manipulated to show what they wanted them to show. Do not let data alone be your sole choice of information.
    2. Strategy Lies – You should have a vision and a direction of where you want your business to go before you decide on the proper strategy to take. These three things are nothing without each ones particular important information. You will have no strategy without a direction to go in. There will be no direction without the vision of where you want to end up. So, you see, you need all three to take your business to the top.
    3. Experts Lie – “Opinions are like elbows, everyone has one”. With so much information out there today, experts can and will get things wrong. Where they get their information from, how they decipher that information and then relay that information to you can make all the difference in the world. Remember, past experience has nothing to do with future outcomes. Most “experts” are using past data to form their conclusions. No two projects will ever be the same. Your project may be similar to what they researched, but you could have one very different idea that changes the whole outcome. Take what the experts say, add your research/opinion and make an educated decision for yourself. This key leadership skill of being able to judge expert judgment is huge now and will only grow over time.
    4. Your Gut May Lie – Going with your “Gut” may not be such a good idea in business. You may feel that something is totally going to work, but is that wishful thinking on your part? Research will help you know the difference. It’s great to feel strongly about something, but also do your due diligence to see if it is viable.
    5. Downplaying Reality Lies – Things are as bad as they seem! Don’t listen to anyone who tries to white-wash a crisis (be it big or small). Knowing exactly when to take action is the most important response to any problem. Do not let their denial of reality slow down response time to any problem that can harm your business. Let everyone know that you need all hands on deck to fix the problem immediately.

    From Learning to Marketing, One Leader’s Worthwhile Switch

    I recently read this article and thought that I should share it with all of you. Have you ever had a manager that has gone from sales to the marketing end of the business and still acts as a salesman with their approach to management? I have and I found it very frustrating. They are now coaches who need to understand how to observe and speak to people. Let me sell, you help me understand the behavior behind the sale.

    Here is the article from clomedia.com:

    The chief learning officer role is a flexible one. Richardson’s Andrea Grodnitzky shared how her move from CLO to CMO opened her eyes to beneficial sales-based learning strategies.

    January 9, 2017

    by Nidhi Madhavan

    Successful marketers need to fully understand their customers. For Andrea Grodnitzky, the new chief marketing officer at Richardson Sales Training, her customers are learning leaders at some of the world’s top sales organizations.

    Grodnitzky spent the prior year as Richardson’s chief learning officer. She’s been with the sales performance improvement company for almost 14 years, working with founder Linda Richardson to develop core programs and eventually lead the design and facilitation teams. As CLO, Grodnitzky took on a customer-facing role, writing thought leadership pieces and representing Richardson to existing and prospective clients. Thus, the transition to CMO came naturally.

    “Our customers are both sales professionals and learning leaders,” she explained. “I’ve been working with these folks for quite some time, so it’s nice to bring that knowledge with me to this new role.”

    She spoke to Chief Learning Officer about sales organizations’ learning needs and the trends shaping them.

    Richardson is a 37-year-old company. How have the learning needs of sales teams changed over time?

    The most dramatic changes have happened in just the past few years. First, both business buyers and consumers have changed their buying behavior due to the availability of information online and advances in mobile technology; we can now ask opinions and research products instantly. This shift means sales people must be upskilled to engage with today’s hyper-informed customers.

    Second, the pace of business has sped up. In some ways, technology has helped salespeople become more efficient, but expectations from management and customers have increased as well. Learning solutions now need to fit into busier lifestyles. Companies need to prioritize skills training and make sure that learning is bite-sized, easily accessible and relevant.

    Finally, higher buying expectations have led many companies to form extended sales teams with individuals who don’t have formal sales backgrounds. Learning leaders need to ensure they provide these teams with the right knowledge and skills.

    Richardson works with many Fortune 500 and Fortune 1000 clients. Are there any training strategies common to these companies that contribute to their success?

    There are certainly a variety of approaches, but there are some common themes we see in our most successful clients:

    1. They decide what success looks like before they begin. They identify the key performance indicators that matter to them and then partner with firms like us to create the right measurement approach. They also look at their progress along the way to inform their continued investment and adjust to learner needs.
    2. They have strong buy-in from leadership, in words and actions. Strong organizations orchestrate senior leader buy-in and ongoing engagement as part of their plans, making sure leaders themselves understand the importance of their investment and role in training initiatives.
    3. They ensure that learning is contextual and relevant. Sales professionals don’t like spending time on activities they don’t perceive as important. Successful organizations connect the dots on how their programs will help them meet targets by utilizing case studies and real-life scenarios.

    Sustaining sales behaviors taught during training is one of Richardson’s key goals. What mistakes do organizations often make reinforcing learning in the field?

    Sales managers are an important investment area; their support is critical for any learning initiative to succeed. But learning leaders often take for granted that managers know how to observe and coach. For example, a manager may understand the importance of a strong opening with a customer, but their coaching will be watered down if they haven’t been taught the observable behaviors to watch for.

    Organizations also need to train managers on how to coach effectively. Most managers are former sales professionals, but the skills that helped them succeed in sales can conflict with those needed to be a great coach. A sales manager might be itching to take over a sales encounter, but they need to learn to step back and develop their team members’ skills.

    We talked about trends that have already affected sales teams, but are there any new learning trends we may see in 2017 and beyond?

    We’ve spent some time listening to our clients during advisory boards and quarterly meetings, and here’s what we’re hearing:

    Mobile learning: It’s no longer just nice to have. It’s been on the horizon, but not all sales organizations are quite there. Sales people live on their phones; if you want to reach them, that’s where to go.

    Expectations: Learner expectations are no longer based on other training programs. Learning organizations need to take a cue from digital spaces like Facebook, YouTube and Google, where people spend most of their time.

    Personalization: Engaging content meets learners exactly where they are on the learning journey. New technology and techniques allow organizations to personalize content without massive effort.

    Analytics: We’re in the “show me” age. Learning leaders will see increased efforts to track and display impactful results. The key is to tell the story around the data.

    How To Avoid These 5 Leadership Lies

    1. Data Lies – Remember the recent election? What was the data showing? It all showed that Hillary would be our next President—Wrong! It could have been hacked (by Russia some say) or manipulated to show what they wanted them to show. Do not let data alone be your sole choice of information.
    2. Strategy Lies – You should have a vision and a direction of where you want your business to go before you decide on the proper strategy to take. These three things are nothing without each ones particular important information. You will have no strategy without a direction to go in. There will be no direction without the vision of where you want to end up. So, you see, you need all three to take your business to the top.
    3. Experts Lie – “Opinions are like elbows, everyone has one”. With so much information out there today, experts can and will get things wrong. Where they get their information from, how they decipher that information and then relay that information to you can make all the difference in the world. Remember, past experience has nothing to do with future outcomes. Most “experts” are using past data to form their conclusions. No two projects will ever be the same. Your project may be similar to what they researched, but you could have one very different idea that changes the whole outcome. Take what the experts say, add your research/opinion and make an educated decision for yourself. This key leadership skill of being able to judge expert judgment is huge now and will only grow over time.
    4. Your Gut May Lie – Going with your “Gut” may not be such a good idea in business. You may feel that something is totally going to work, but is that wishful thinking on your part? Research will help you know the difference. It’s great to feel strongly about something, but also do your due diligence to see if it is viable.
    5. Downplaying Reality Lies – Things are as bad as they seem! Don’t listen to anyone who tries to white-wash a crisis (be it big or small). Knowing exactly when to take action is the most important response to any problem. Do not let their denial of reality slow down response time to any problem that can harm your business. Let everyone know that you need all hands on deck to fix the problem immediately.