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    Hope For American Manufacturing

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    “Manufacturing is one of the foundations of what American society and our communities are. If we can keep jobs and revenues here in our communities, then it’s good for all of us. We will all have higher-paying jobs, and we will all have happier communities.” Said Scott Marland, director of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center at The University of Utah.

    The United States lost 30 percent of its manufacturing jobs between 1998 and 2016, according to Federal Reserve data. Over the next ten years, nearly 3½ million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled, and 2 million are expected to go unfilled due to the lack of skills by today’s workers. According to a recent report, 80 percent of manufacturers report a moderate or serious shortage of qualified applicants for skilled and highly-skilled production positions. (Source: Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute)  – See more here

    The University of Utah, along with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, announced the opening of the new Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center on campus. The center is there to give services to manufacturing companies in the areas of technology, worker education, and searching for investors. This center is part of a national group of centers across the US and is managed by the US Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    These centers are helping manufacturing companies on a global scale with services in growth, operational excellence, and new technologies like digital, nano, and additive manufacturing. Hope For American Manufacturing and Its Employees

    In 2015, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned $81,289 annually, including pay and benefits. The average worker in all nonfarm industries earned $63,830. Looking specifically at wages, the average manufacturing worker earned nearly $26.00 per hour, according to the latest figures, not including benefits. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis and Bureau of Labor Statistics) – See more here 

    For every $1.00 spent in manufacturing, another $1.81 is added to the economy. That is the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector. Also, for every one worker in manufacturing, there are another four employees hired elsewhere. (Source: NAM calculations using IMPLAN) – See more here 

    We need to make America great again and bring back our manufacturing. Bring back our middle class. Bring back our dignity as a nation, and bring back Made In The USA. Keeping jobs and money here, in our communities is good for all of us. We need to train our future workers in these industries and with these new skills needed so that they can succeed in helping to build our nation and our manufacturing industry back up to the top.

    Hope For American Manufacturing

    image

    “Manufacturing is one of the foundations of what American society and our communities are. If we can keep jobs and revenues here in our communities, then it’s good for all of us. We will all have higher-paying jobs, and we will all have happier communities.” Said Scott Marland, director of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center at The University of Utah.

    The United States lost 30 percent of its manufacturing jobs between 1998 and 2016, according to Federal Reserve data. Over the next ten years, nearly 3½ million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled, and 2 million are expected to go unfilled due to the lack of skills by today’s workers. According to a recent report, 80 percent of manufacturers report a moderate or serious shortage of qualified applicants for skilled and highly-skilled production positions. (Source: Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute)  – See more here

    The University of Utah, along with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, announced the opening of the new Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center on campus. The center is there to give services to manufacturing companies in the areas of technology, worker education, and searching for investors. This center is part of a national group of centers across the US and is managed by the US Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    These centers are helping manufacturing companies on a global scale with services in growth, operational excellence, and new technologies like digital, nano, and additive manufacturing. Hope For American Manufacturing and Its Employees

    In 2015, the average manufacturing worker in the United States earned $81,289 annually, including pay and benefits. The average worker in all nonfarm industries earned $63,830. Looking specifically at wages, the average manufacturing worker earned nearly $26.00 per hour, according to the latest figures, not including benefits. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis and Bureau of Labor Statistics) – See more here 

    For every $1.00 spent in manufacturing, another $1.81 is added to the economy. That is the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector. Also, for every one worker in manufacturing, there are another four employees hired elsewhere. (Source: NAM calculations using IMPLAN) – See more here 

    We need to make America great again and bring back our manufacturing. Bring back our middle class. Bring back our dignity as a nation, and bring back Made In The USA. Keeping jobs and money here, in our communities is good for all of us. We need to train our future workers in these industries and with these new skills needed so that they can succeed in helping to build our nation and our manufacturing industry back up to the top.